Thursday, April 21, 2011

Nadia Abu El-Haj is Back Questioning Jewish Link to Israel

Another gem from Columbia's Center for Palestine Studies efforts to de-link Israel from Jewish history. This time in conjunction with NYU's Kevorkian Center for Near East Studies. If you recall, Nadia Abu El-Haj made news when Columbia students, alumni and faculty contested her right to tenure. This was the result of her book, Facts on the Ground:Archaeological Practice and Territorial Self-Fashioning in Israeli Society, which proposed that Jewish archeological connection to the land of Israel was a political construction not based on archeological evidence. More recently she has been mining research to deconstruct efforts to prove genetic links among groups of the Jewish diaspora to each other and to Israel.

She will be presenting a first chapter of her book, The Search for Origins, Again: The Biological Sciences and the Jewish Self, and I recommend that New Yorkers who are able to attend the workshop do so in order to balance out an audience that will undoubtedly be filled with her groupies:

The Search for Origins, Again: The Biological Sciences and the Jewish Self

Nadia Abu El-Haj, Anthropology, Barnard College
Discussant: Michael Ralph, Anthropology, NYU
25 April 2011, 5:00 - 7:00 PM
Hagop Kevorkian Center, 50 Washington Square South (enter at 255 Sullivan Street)


Here is the paper made available by NYU in advance:


And here are some links for background:

More Bad Genetic Scholarship: http://www.campus-watch.org/article/id/4235

Nadia Abu El-Haj, Tenured Barnard Professor:

Searching for Facts on the Ground:

Looking Glass Archeology:

Facts on the Ground – Nadia Abu El-Haj’s New Slavo in the Arab Propaganda War Against Israel

1 comment:

  1. How convenient of her to schedule an anti-Jewish talk on the last days of Passover!

    Nycerbarb

    ReplyDelete

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